Clean Room Design and Validation

  • We Provide our support and experience in design and validate contamination controlled enviroments for manufacturing, production,cleaning, assembling and processing of medical device and pharma products.

    A cleanroom or clean room is an environment, typically used in manufacturing, including of pharmaceutical products or scientific research, with a low level of environmental pollutants such as dust, airborne microbes, aerosol particles, and chemical vapors.

    Food production, pharmaceuticals, aerospace and automotive manufacturing are just some of the many areas where controlled and classified clean rooms are essential. Clean rooms are zones where contaminants in the air are highly controlled. Without effective control, contamination can wreak havoc on products and processes.

    220px-laminar_flow_reinraum

    ISO has a series of standards dedicated to clean rooms, outlining the practices and procedures required to manage the risk of contamination. The first two in the series have just been updated to take into account the latest technological developments and market requirements.cleanroom

    Clean Room Class

    CleanRoom-Classification

    Note: As of ISO 14644-1:2015, 5 µm particles shall no longer be considered in Class 5 rooms.

    Cleanroom Overview

    Cleanrooms can be very large. Entire manufacturing facilities can be contained within a cleanroom with factory floors covering thousands of square meters. They are used extensively in semiconductor manufacturing, biotechnology, the life sciences, and other fields that are very sensitive to environmental contamination.

    The air entering a cleanroom from outside is filtered to exclude dust, and the air inside is constantly recirculated through high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) and/or ultra-low particulate air (ULPA) filters to remove internally generated contaminants.

    Staff enter and leave through airlocks (sometimes including an air shower stage), and wear protective clothing such as hoods, face masks, gloves, boots, and coveralls.

    Equipment inside the cleanroom is designed to generate minimal air contamination. Only special mops and buckets are used. Cleanroom furniture is designed to produce a minimum of particles and to be easy to clean. Common materials such as paper, pencils, and fabrics made from natural fibers are often excluded, and alternatives used. Cleanrooms are not sterile (i.e., free of uncontrolled microbes);only airborne particles are controlled. Particle levels are usually tested using a particle counter and microorganisms detected and counted through environmental monitoring methods.

    Some cleanrooms are kept at a positive pressure so if any leaks occur, air leaks out of the chamber instead of unfiltered air coming in.

    Some cleanroom HVAC systems control the humidity to low levels, such that extra equipment (“ionizers”) is necessary to prevent electrostatic discharge problems. Low-level cleanrooms may only require special shoes, with completely smooth soles that do not track in dust or dirt. However, for safety reasons, shoe soles must not create slipping hazards. Access to a cleanroom is usually restricted to those wearing a cleanroom suit.

    In cleanrooms in which the standards of air contamination are less rigorous, the entrance to the cleanroom may not have an air shower. An anteroom (known as a “gray room”) is used to put on clean-room clothing. Some manufacturing facilities do not use fully classified cleanrooms, but use some cleanroom practices to maintain their contamination requirements.

     

  • Ask a Quote or Contact Us

This post is also available in: German, Italian